Saturday Musings: Dublin Out and About Spring What’s On

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I love watching people. When I go to a city I love to sit in a cafe and just people watch. I also like to do and explore. I have always been a wanderer of the odd and strange. I like neighborhoods and their communities. I can’t wait to get back into a place like Dublin and get a feel for things. Tough when you are not a local, or a Dub. You can try to scratch the surface of a city, but not necessarily get a truer feeling for it with online guides. So, the answer is, always read up on the local What’s On, and I always look for the independent and non mainstream.

When you land in a city and need to get a feel for it, neighborhoods are the best bet I feel. Catching up with a local feel even if you aren’t a local to this city is more holistic. Starting with a cup of coffee in the morning, and finding the right cafe is key. While Dublin and many other Euro cities have Starbucks imports, just like at home here in the PDX the fine crafted local coffee and beer brews are the thing. You are supporting small businesses which mean local families. Plus you can really talk to artisan baristas about what they are doing.

Clement and Pekoe sounds like the treat for me, and will I check out Petit Cafe as I really like the small homey ones, since that’s so up my alley for sleepy wake up mornings. What will you adventure with in coffee in Dublin? Let me know your favorite coffee spaces.

Article The Top 10 Independent Coffee Shops in Town
https://lovindublin.com/food/the-top-10-independent-coffee-shops-in-town

Lunch or having your tea in the afternoon after walking the town? I spend hours roaming area and trying to get to as much as I can that is alternative or just unique to an area. I find that restaurants can be hit or miss, but pop ups can be fun because someone new is coming in with a new foodie sensations to try. In Dublin the places for Pop Up culture are Granby Park, Temple Bar area, Dawson Street area, Henry Street and Merchant Quay areas. Pop-Ups happen as they are much easier to start up than a brick and mortar type restaurant or shop which also lends to the great experimental foodie fare you will find there. They still have their challenges as any merchant will tell you, but the Pop-Up can offer you a great affordable experience to your shopping experience, and talking to the people running these fabulous treats will give you great cultural insight to the area. Chat up a Poppie.

Oh, and of course moving on to the lovely afternoon brew of the well crafted amber liquid will snag your taste buds, too. Dublin has started exploding with craft beer in the last few years. Dublin has beer a plenty, and besides it’s most famous exports, has the crafty artisan varieties flowing. Look for Porterhouse Brewing, Trouble Brewing with it’s Pumpkin, and Eight Degrees.

Not a beer drinker. I must confess that being a Cali Expat, I grew up on wine. Wine can be hit and miss in the isles I have found, great imports mostly from France and Italy. You can find some really good wines traveling in the country. In my recent travels I did find that some South American Sauvignon Blanc seemed to be popular. Sometimes you can find a good German Rhine at some wine merchant’s. For some of the best wine bars, try Ely Bar & Brasserie or La Caverna. Or check out the wine merchants in town to snag a bottle for an evening picnic since it’s light until 10 pm or later in the summer.

Now, what’s really going on this next month here, well Drop Dead has a Burlesque show Sunday the 30th, looks like some great Ska music going down on May 5 With Selector and The Beat for an after party. For some really great shows, go to The Grand Social.

Calendar for May
http://www.dublintown.ie/whats-on-events/may-listing-at-the-grand-social/

Check Out What’s On
http://www.dublintown.ie/whats-on/

15 Top Craft Beer Bars in Dublin
https://foursquare.com/top-places/dublin/best-places-craft-beer

Top Wine Bars
http://thetaste.ie/wp/13-great-wine-bars-to-visit-in-dublin-this-christmas/

10 Dublin Pop-Ups
https://theculturetrip.com/europe/ireland/articles/10-dublin-pop-ups-to-check-out-in-2017/

Are you a resident Dub or travelled there recently, share your foodie finds with us.

Glasgow: Finding a Good Japanese Restaurant Off the Atlantic Ocean?

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Sushi and other fish dishes rely on getting very fresh fish from the Pacific Ocean. We here on the Pacific Rim are quite spoiled. Japanese restaurants are quite fantastic here. So what do you do when traveling in the UK and Ireland and your fav cuisine is a bit elusive? Keep trying. Most Japanese restaurants have adapted to working off the Atlantic Ocean, using fish found there for the sushi and traditional fish stews, after all, dashi is usually shaved bonito which is freeze dried and easy to transport.  But you won’t see Yellowtail (Hamachi) or other fish from the Pacific. Or if you do, it’s not fresh, it’s frozen and you can taste that difference. So when you are in the UK, you may just have to settle for chicken or beef dishes.

My second day in Glasgow and I wanted Japanese. I looked up a restaurant on Yelp and hoped for the best. The sushi Nigiri list had much to be desired, so I tried a traditional dinner instead, more comfort food, Nanakusa was pretty good overall. But then I was on a quest. Well, what happens when you get an unsatisfactory taste sensation? You seek out better choices. The next Japanese I tried was off the Buchanan Mall area and up some stairs, Ichiban. Out of the way a bit, but their Japanese curry was good. I lamented with the Japanese wait staff over finding good Nigiri in Scotland. I then chatted with them about getting a menu to catered to the Atlantic v. Pacific fish market. There was a degree of sadness felt, a commiseration. But if you look you can still find some good Japanese if not great fusion, if you are willing to seek it out.

Top Glasgow Sushi and Japanese

In Edinburgh I tried out a Japanese that was a fusion restaurant. Eh, it left a bit to be desired and well, I had to really get attention to get attention. Oh, when ordering Sake, make sure you tell them hot. Don’t assume they will know. Restaurants in the UK tend to default to room temp or cold. Also, their flasks aren’t as large as in the US. Just a tip.

Top Edinburgh Sushi

Dublin Japanese

Belfast Japanese